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WaterAid urges EPA to pursue court action against TaMA

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The WaterAid Ghana, a non-governmental organization has urged the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Northern Region not to abandon its court action against the Tamale Metropolitan Assembly (TaMA) over the management of the landfill site in Gbalahi in the Sagnarigu district of the northern region.

 WaterAid says the EPA’s intention to sue the Tamale metropolitan was in the right direction and will prevent Gbalahi and its surrounding communities from contracting respiratory diseases.

The NGO is surprised that the landfill site which is supposed to be a proper engineered site is now posing serious health hazards to the people in the area.

According to WaterAid, EPA in the northern Regional will not be the first government agency suing another government institution, citing EPA in Accra suing Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Water Aid support follows Northern region EPA  November last year warning that it will sued TaMA if it fail to manage the landfill site properly after it had written several letters to the assembly.

Head of Policy and Partnership at WaterAid, Mr Ibrahim Musah gave the encouragement when he addressed members of Coalition NGOs in Water and Sanitation (CONIWAS) at a day’s policy dialogue on sustainable sanitation service delivery in Ghana in Tamale. Mr Ibrahim said EPA suing TaMA will wake up local authorities from their slumber.

He explained that, when the outcome of the court against TaMA court is positive, it may bring in investors in sanitation in the Tamale metropolis.

In 2014, an Accra High Court ordered AMA to stop dumping untreated human waste into Korle Gonno beach popularly called “Lavender Hill” due to its negative health implications on the environment.

The EPA victory Mr Ibrahim said brought Netherlands government to invest into the area and it has created employment for the people in the area.  He encouraged the EPA not to rest on its oars in ensuring that the assembly lives up to the expectation in protecting the environment.

The management of the only landfill site in the Northern Region took center stage in the policy dialogue session after members of Water and Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) expressed serious concerns about the lackadaisical attitude of TaMA towards the site.

According to them, the negative effects were not only on people’s health but also on school children’s education as they sometimes abandon classes to scavenge.  Programs Manager of WaterAid in charge of the three regions of the North, Hajj Bello Sulaiman entreated WASH members and other stakeholders in the water sector to show commitment in addressing the problems confronting water and sanitation in Ghana.

Hajji Bello also urged NGOs in water sector to position themselves strategically so that when donors support folds up, they will be able to continue assisting the people.

The day’s policy dialogue on sustainable sanitation was organized by CONWAS Northern zonal secretariat with financial support from WaterAid Ghana under the European Union program. 

 

The WaterAid Ghana, a non-governmental organization has urged the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Northern Region not to abandon its court action against the Tamale Metropolitan Assembly (TaMA) over the management of the landfill site in Gbalahi in the Sagnarigu district of the northern region.

 WaterAid says the EPA’s intention to sue the Tamale metropolitan was in the direction and will prevent Gbalahi and its surrounding communities from contracting respiratory diseases.

The NGO is surprised that the landfill site which is supposed to be a proper engineered site is now posing serious health hazards to the people in the area.

According to WaterAid, EPA in the northern Regional will not be the first government agency suing another government institution, citing EPA in Accra suing Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Water Aid support follows Northern region EPA  November last year warning that it will sued TaMA if it fail to manage the landfill site properly after it had written several letters to the assembly.

Head of Policy and Partnership at WaterAid, Mr Ibrahim Musah gave the encouragement when he addressed members of Coalition NGOs in Water and Sanitation (CONIWAS) at a day’s policy dialogue on sustainable sanitation service delivery in Ghana in Tamale. Mr Ibrahim said EPA suing TaMA will wake up local authorities from their slumber.

He explained that, when the outcome of the court against TaMA court is positive, it may bring in investors in sanitation in the Tamale metropolis.

In 2014, an Accra High Court ordered AMA to stop dumping untreated human waste into Korle Gonno beach popularly called “Lavender Hill” due to its negative health implications on the environment.

The EPA victory Mr Ibrahim said brought Netherlands government to invest into the area and it has created employment for the people in the area.  He encouraged the EPA not to rest on its oars in ensuring that the assembly lives up to the expectation in protecting the environment.

The management of the only landfill site in the Northern Region took center stage in the policy dialogue session after members of Water and Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) expressed serious concerns about the lackadaisical attitude of TaMA towards the site.

According to them, the negative effects were not only on people’s health but also on school children’s education as they sometimes abandon classes to scavenge.  Programs Manager of WaterAid in charge of the three regions of the North, Hajj Bello Sulaiman entreated WASH members and other stakeholders in the water sector to show commitment in addressing the problems confronting water and sanitation in Ghana.

Hajji Bello also urged NGOs in water sector to position themselves strategically so that when donors support folds up, they will be able to continue assisting the people.

The day’s policy dialogue on sustainable sanitation was organized by CONWAS Northern zonal secretariat with financial support from WaterAid Ghana under the European Union program. 

The WaterAid Ghana, a non-governmental organization has urged the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Northern Region not to abandon its court action against the Tamale Metropolitan Assembly (TaMA) over the management of the landfill site in Gbalahi in the Sagnarigu district of the northern region.

 WaterAid says the EPA’s intention to sue the Tamale metropolitan was in the direction and will prevent Gbalahi and its surrounding communities from contracting respiratory diseases.

The NGO is surprised that the landfill site which is supposed to be a proper engineered site is now posing serious health hazards to the people in the area.

According to WaterAid, EPA in the northern Regional will not be the first government agency suing another government institution, citing EPA in Accra suing Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Water Aid support follows Northern region EPA  November last year warning that it will sued TaMA if it fail to manage the landfill site properly after it had written several letters to the assembly.

Head of Policy and Partnership at WaterAid, Mr Ibrahim Musah gave the encouragement when he addressed members of Coalition NGOs in Water and Sanitation (CONIWAS) at a day’s policy dialogue on sustainable sanitation service delivery in Ghana in Tamale. Mr Ibrahim said EPA suing TaMA will wake up local authorities from their slumber.

He explained that, when the outcome of the court against TaMA court is positive, it may bring in investors in sanitation in the Tamale metropolis.

In 2014, an Accra High Court ordered AMA to stop dumping untreated human waste into Korle Gonno beach popularly called “Lavender Hill” due to its negative health implications on the environment.

The EPA victory Mr Ibrahim said brought Netherlands government to invest into the area and it has created employment for the people in the area.  He encouraged the EPA not to rest on its oars in ensuring that the assembly lives up to the expectation in protecting the environment.

The management of the only landfill site in the Northern Region took center stage in the policy dialogue session after members of Water and Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) expressed serious concerns about the lackadaisical attitude of TaMA towards the site.

According to them, the negative effects were not only on people’s health but also on school children’s education as they sometimes abandon classes to scavenge.  Programs Manager of WaterAid in charge of the three regions of the North, Hajj Bello Sulaiman entreated WASH members and other stakeholders in the water sector to show commitment in addressing the problems confronting water and sanitation in Ghana.

Hajji Bello also urged NGOs in water sector to position themselves strategically so that when donors support folds up, they will be able to continue assisting the people.

The day’s policy dialogue on sustainable sanitation was organized by CONWAS Northern zonal secretariat with financial support from WaterAid Ghana under the European Union program. 

 

 

 

 

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